7 Key factors to consider when Choosing a Corporate Wiki

This is a guest post by Robin Singh.  Robin is a Technical Support Executive with a combined experience of 6 years. He is well acquainted with various Knowledge base tools and is currently associated with ProProfs. In his free time, Robin enjoys reading and traveling

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Choosing a wiki for your business organization is one of the best decisions you can make as they are time-effective and will help you streamline your operations. For instance, if you need to email some important information to a number of people within your workplace, you can easily inform everyone concerned by putting all the information in your corporate wiki. This is just one of the numerous uses of a corporate wiki.

One of the most significant benefits that a wiki offers is increased efficiency and productivity, as it can be updated by multiple users in real-time, which eventually improves communication and collaboration.

In order to choose the right wiki software for your business organization, there are some key factors that you need to consider, so read on to find out what they are.

  1. Choose a Software Delivery Model for Your Needs

There are three software delivery models when it comes to choosing and managing a corporate wiki, and they include – on-premises wiki, a hosted wiki (SaaS) and an appliance wiki. If you go for an on-premises wiki, you are choosing to install the software on your own and store all of your data on your own servers. On the other hand, if you go for a hosted wiki, your wiki software vendor will store your data on their servers.

The third software delivery model is a combination of the first two models. It is a popular option as you don’t have to tackle the installation of your wiki as your solution provider will do it for you while the data remains stored on your servers.

  1. Authenticate Your Corporate Wiki Users

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The authentication of users is important because everyone with access should know who exactly made every single edit to your corporate wiki. Also, it will enable you to grant access to some of your wikis only to a small group of people for instance group of executives. Therefore, your corporate wiki should enable user authentication to verify the user’s identity and it can be achieved by a single sign-on  (SSO) or LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol).

  1. Communicate with Your IT Department

Communicating with your IT department is crucial if you choose an on-premises software delivery model, because they can tell you exactly what needs to be done in order to successfully install your corporate wiki. They certainly have the right knowledge for choosing the right wiki software for your company and they know what kind of server storage you will need. Hence, it is best to consult the IT team.

  1. Eliminate the Risk of Mistakes

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How many times have you edited a document and made a mistake that caused all of your added content to be completely lost? The same problem can happen with a corporate wiki as well, hence selecting the right wiki software will enable you to save each and every edit without any possible glitch taking place.

You need to ensure the software will enable you to save and track all the changes made to your wiki so that you can restore every previous version of an edited document in case the content gets lost.

  1. Track Every Change Made to Your Corporate Wiki

How can you track all the changes made to your wiki in real-time? It is simple. The notifications can come in handy here. Therefore, you need to make sure you enable notifications and monitor every change that occurs. One can achieve that either by enabling email notifications or really simple syndication (RSS). RSS feeds are an effective way to keep track of the changes to your wiki as well.

Another precise way to track changes in your wiki is through external API. Tracking options are essential in keeping everything under the tab. Success tracking tools like Rise.global offers great insights to track your changes and progress. The real time tracking options and critical reporting and analytics can keep you on top of your game and offer insights to improve your team coordination even further.

  1. Tag Your Documents and Make Your Wiki Easily Searchable

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The most important feature of an effective wiki is its search capability. Hence, you need to make sure your corporate wiki has a powerful search option that can help the users to find exactly what they are looking for within seconds. This is especially important when your wiki grows in size, as it can be difficult and downright stressful to find relevant information.

If you choose to include tags in your documents, it will help your wiki become easily searchable and ensure users are able to instantly find any page they are looking for. However, you should avoid general tags, such as “sales” and “marketing” because, otherwise, tagging won’t be of any help when you scale your business and create a number of new documents.

  1. Add as Many Useful Features as You Can

The more features you add to your corporate wiki, the more effective it would actually be. If the users find it helpful, your wiki will help them achieve their goals faster. One of the excellent and pretty useful features you could add to your wiki is multilingual support, as it can help users overcome language barriers when communicating and collaborating with those users who speak different languages.

Also, you can add the feature of attaching documents and provide a widget for making your wiki instantly accessible via your personalized web page. There are a lot more features you can consider adding to your corporate wiki, so ensure the wiki software you choose enables you to add those features most important for your business.

Rise customer ClickMechanic shares their success story

It’s not often that you get a customer story told in a guest post like this. We’re thrilled with the ClickMechanic team’s Rise journey – this guest blog has been written by Simon Tinsley, Click Mechanic’s Digital Marketing Executive:

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Hi! We’re ClickMechanic, not only are we satisfied customers of Rise, but we’ve taken the success tracking philosophy of the effective use of data and targets and applied it throughout our company with great results. We’re so excited about sharing our story so it can help other growing businesses that we asked Rise to let us share our story on their blog and they kindly agreed.

Firstly, a little background, we’re an online marketplace for car repair, servicing and inspections with a nationwide network of mechanics. We’ve used Rise’s leader board to promote engagement on social channels amongst our mechanics and found that it provided a 23% uplift in sharing from our mechanics.

More striking has been the impact that applying targets carefully has had throughout our company. We noticed recently that a quarter of bookings placed never get assigned to a mechanic – meaning more unsatisfied customers and less revenue for us. Recently we introduced a number of initiatives that reduced the number of customers without a mechanic by 60%. So, how did we do it?

Firstly, we gave people responsibility for a particular area of customer service each day. This focus allowed our team to reduce the amount of time they spent switching tasks, and therefore reduced wasted time. Alongside this, it gave a sense of ownership and responsibility over that area for the day. Secondly, we made the key metrics visible to the whole team. Such that the team can see the results of their efforts. The immediate feedback has seen our net promoter score increase from 80 to 85.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we introduced targets for assigning bookings to the team. Here, we followed the key principle of ‘Count Fruit Not Leaves. Initially these were individual targets, though we found this provided faulty incentives. Team members on other tasks for the day would try to squeeze in assigning bookings to inflate their numbers and ‘win’ and neglect other tasks. With this in mind, we switched to a team target to encourage co-operation between the team. Not only have we seen the KPIs increase, but also we’ve had feedback that the team like having something to aim for and find it motivating.

We’ve also applied personal metrics to our development team. We work on a fortnightly sprint and plan our engineer’s time using ‘points’ to represent blocks of time. By doing so, we are better able to plan our development work and coordinate the rollout of new product features. Alongside this, it creates accountability within the development team – if tasks aren’t completed then the reasons why can be discussed transparently. Tracking this data allows for improving our estimation of how long projects take and can help us to identify if there are certain aspects of our process that consistently cause projects to run over.

Rise launches monetization features for boards

In case you were wondering, Rise’s network model is akin to meetup.com. We charge managers a fee but crucially we let managers monetize their boards in whatever way they like.

To support this we’ve added a major new monetization feature this week that you can see in action on the ENERTOR Sports Journalist 100.
The three key features are:

  1. adding ads around your leaderboard (above, to the right and intersticially
  2. capturing emails for your marketing campaign
  3. adding ads on your email notifications in 3 different sections

I recommend “following” the ENERTOR board to see it all in action

The ENERTOR Sports Journalist 100 2016-05-03 15-49-03

 

Travel1k Email Advert Example

Reflections on using Rise to support conference-based gamification

This is a guest blog from:

Fiona MacNeill, Learning Technologies Adviser, University of Brighton and UCISA Digital Capabilities committee member. AboutMe: http://about.me/fmacneill Twitter: @fmacneill

In early June I had the pleasure of implementing a conference-wide gamification activity in support of the UCISA Digital Capabilities event. The event took place at MediaCity, Salford; a vibrant and engaging venue for an event stocked-full of innovative ideas. The event focused on showcasing successful practices for supporting academic staff and learners in their use of technology within further and higher education. Another goal of the event was to highlight findings from the recent Digital Capabilities survey. So when a member of the event organising committee, Iain Cameron (University of Aberdeen, and UCISA Digital Capabilities committee), mentioned the idea of a Twitter selfie (or Twelfie) competition as part of the proceedings; Rise immediately came to my mind as the right tool for the job! I had encountered Rise before at a demo at the International Confex event in 2013 and then again during the Mahara 2014 Hui held at the University of Brighton.

The rules of the game were simple and already outlined for me by the organisers. One point was awarded for original selfies; @mentions; and retweets featuring the #udigcap hashtag. Two points were awarded to reward the befriending behaviours needed to: take selfies with another delegate; take selfies with a speaker; and take selfies with organisers. Three points were awarded for imaginative selfies; selfies with passing celebrities who work or visit the television studios of MediaCity; and a selfie with a famous landmark. Although the game was simple, we entered into it with a sense of playfulness, completed by my donning the literal udig-Cap on my head, to signify my position as the twelfie official! Here’s the photo evidence

Leaderboard-cropped

Benefits

Observed positive effects of using Rise Leaderboard:

  • Rise really stoked attendee engagement via Twitter. There were around 90 tweets that included twelfies. Overall, there were almost 1200 tweets related to the event, many of which were a direct result of attendees taking part in the Leaderboard.

TweetFeed

  • The competition called for attendees to take photos of themselves with other attendees, speakers and celebrities. This encouraged both in-person and online engagement.

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  • The twelfie competition promoted a sense of fun and resulted in crowdsourced documentation of the event proceedings. The documentation is now archived as a Storify
    • The competition boosted discursive engagement and publicised the twitter feed prior to the event. This was largely achieved by some pre-conference challenges where attendees were asked to take engaging photographs of their journey to the conference.

TweetFeedwphoto2

Top tips for using Rise in a conference situation

  1. Our photo-based metrics meant that we had to do a lot of manual scoring. I suggest using a wider variety of metrics, including a mixture of automatic metrics derived from twitter polling and manual metrics.
  2. I recommend linking a Google doc to the active leaderboard to enable simpler player addition and
  3. Limit the number of times a certain metric can be scored. We found that some of the twelfies became repetitive, as there was not a limit on the number of times that a twelfie could be scored.
    • Include some wildcard activities to promote positive conference behaviour:
      • g. tweet and tag someone whom you met at lunchtime (with their permission);
      • engage in the conference treasure hunt and tweet what you found etc.
  1. Take greater advantage of the need for the human superviser, or games-master, and consider using them to lead tweet-ups of certain topics raised during the event. These could also have point-awarding options.
  2. Consider day-by-day scoring and options for remote attendees and second day attendees.
  3. Points for @mentions of anything other than the conference hashtag, can affect the quality of tweets’ written content due to the character limit. Best to keep it to one @mention metric.
    Add players in advance of the conference, if possible.
  4. Having clearly defined board release times was a good strategy and led to a sense of anticipation, e.g. breaks worked well as times to release and show the updated leaderboard. Leave at least 10 minutes for the polls to complete and to release the board. I owe this idea to Katie Piatt (University of Brighton), who used this strategy to great effect at the 2014 Mahara Hui.

Future ideas

As I contemplate gamification at the next iteration of the Digital Capabilities event I have been considering how the competitive element could be developed further. Here are a few ideas, although I won’t go into specifics, as I don’t want to give the game away in advance!

  • Make awards unexpected – as Daniel Pink, explains in his 2010 book, Drive expected extrinsic rewards can negatively affect performance (pp. 63-70). Therefore adding some unexpected rewards for completed tasks could add value. However these rewards will not be itemised on the rules list, so a disclaimer about judge discretion may be helpful!
  • Reward introverts as well as extroverts – one of the best conferences that I have ever attended was Eyeo Festival based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (http://eyeofestival.com). Eyeo is an awe-inspiring event focusing on data visualisation, interactivity and maker ethics. However in the midst of all the flashy stuff, in the two years that I attended they had quiet spaces where one could engage in puzzles and inventions related to the event, sans supervision or sales influence. This was an invaluable opportunity to play and learn. Having an area in a conference like this provides time for time-out and inspiration as well as hidden scoring opportunities!
  • An idea inspired by Jane McGonigal’s book, Reality is Broken (2012): we allow attendees to +1 each other. This is like an in-person analogy of a “favorite” star or a “like” thumbs-up, but because it is real, perhaps it means even more within the context of the event. I like the idea of using physical +1s (think cardboard cutouts the size of a plate) which could become the subject of a selfie; a nice option for camera shy attendees.
  • Finally this is an idea that I owe to Pete Jenkins (http://gamificationplus.uk), who suggested making the next iteration of our competition, a team-based activity. Rise Leaderboard can support this mode of use. The concept is that player interest will be more sustained if they are contributing to a group effort, as opposed to seeing individuals rapidly ascend up the leaderboard and losing the will to compete due to very high leading scores. In the team model points can still be awarded individually for small activities and these can contribute to the collective team score.

Well, I for one am excited about the next Digital Capabilities event!

References

McGonigal, J. (2012). Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World. London: Vintage.

Pink, D. H. (2010). Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us. Edinburgh: Canongate Books.

Telfest 2015 conference uses Rise to enhance conference participation and crowd-source content on social media for non-attendees

This is a guest post by Farzana Latif, posted first on 29th Sept 2015 here

During September 2015’s TELFest (a week long festival consisting of workshops, discussions and drop-in sessions related to Technology Enhanced Learning) we introduced a leaderboard to enhance participation throughout the event, and to encourage the use social media to share experiences amongst colleagues that were unable to attend. Having experienced the leaderboard at the UCISA Spotlight on Capabilities Conference in June, I was interested in using it to introduce ideas related to Gamification, and bring an extra element of fun, to TELFest. The leaderboard is generated by a website called rise.global, which automatically calculates the scores for tweets that contain a specific hashtag, and, following some pointers from Fiona MacNeil who had set it up for the UCISA event, I set up a leaderboard for TELFest. Given the aims behind using the leaderboard, I decided that points should be primarily awarded for tweeting with the #TELFest hashtag and there were additional points for attending drop in sessions and tweeting TELfie’s (TELfest selfies). Below is a breakdown of the points that could be earned:

Tweets with the #TELFest hashtag 1 point
Being Mentioned by someone else 2 points
Having your  #TELFest Posts Retweeted 3 points
Tweeting a TELFie with the hashtag  #TELFest (TELFest, Selfie) 3 points
Attending a drop in session 5 points

Each day we saw the top tweeters changing positions and there was healthy competition amongst TELFest participants.

To keep tweeters motivated, automated tweets were sent out every evening, informing them of their position on the leaderboard.

Twitter activity increased significantly compared to September 2014, there was a tenfold increase in the overall number tweets, a tripling of the number of tweeters and, on the Friday, TELFest trended in the Sheffield area, meaning that it was promoted to local users on the main twitter interface.


An additional benefit of promoting the use of Twitter through the leaderboard was that it helped to capture the variety of views and opinions shared by participants during the event. We were then able to use the tweets to create daily blog posts summarising these discussions using Storify, allowing us to produce a record of the day’s events for participants to look back on and to give some insight into the discussions for those unable to attend.

While the leaderboard was highlighted during the Gamification session as an example of a method to encourage participation and motivate learners, it is hard to say whether, in this case, the leaderboard led to an objective increase in Twitter usage. Early feedback indicates that its’ introduction did motivate some people to tweet more than they might ordinarily, yet others stated that they were unaware of the board. Another reason why the increase in the use of Twitter at TELFest this year cannot be solely attributed to the leaderboard is that we integrated Twitter directly into some of the workshops. It is however clear that the leaderboard did not appear to influence the number of colleagues attending drop-in sessions.
We closed the board on Friday at 12pm and as a token gesture awarded chocolate medal to colleagues that were top of the board – congratulations to Gary, Nik and Maria.


Below is a screenshot of the final top 20 for the leaderboard:

This blog has been verified by Rise: Rd886fcb9534f0f3e25d5be49b850a9bc

London tops Las Vegas, New York and L.A. as the most desirable travel destination for Twitter users

PRESS RELEASE

Monday 6 July 2015, 1pm London

London has come out top in a new report of Top 1000 Travel Destinations on Twitter published by Rise.global, the scorekeeping platform.

The report tracks over 1000 tourist boards for both individual cities and countries in terms of their worldwide following on social network Twitter. Each tourist board is ranked according to number of followers, the more followers a tourist board’s twitter channel has, the higher the rank.

Toby Beresford, CEO of Rise.global said “maintaining an active social media channel demonstrates the vibrancy of demand for visits to a particular location. By providing an interesting flow of content the top tourist boards have managed to grow and maintain their own audience of travellers keen to visit. Social media channels are an excellent way for a tourist board to engage with potential visitors 365 days a year.”

In the report Visit London tops the chart with over 340,000 followers leaving it’s closest competitors, Vegas and I Love New York behind with around 285,000 followers each.

Rise’s Travel Sector specialist, Nick Shah said, “travel has always been a popular section within traditional news media, it’s no surprise that it creates great interest on social media too. This Rise Report is a great way for tourist boards to see where they stand, and see what work they need to do to keep up in the global race for tourist attention.”

The report also shows that Visit Britain has more followers than Visit Phillipines and Tourism Australia, giving the UK the coveted title of most popular country on Twitter.

Just scraping into the list is the 1000th tourist board – Experience Haiti. With just 190 followers, the country clearly has some way to go to engender the same excitement on social media as the leaders.

Rise offers a tracking service for Tourist Boards (and others) seeking to grow their Twitter reach, called the “Twitter Followers Club”. The club provides a free weekly personalised report tracking growth in followers that week and comparing rate of growth with others. To join the club visit https://www.rise.global/twitter-followers-club

To see the full report visit www.rise.global/touristboards

To find out more about Rise and sign up for free membership of the online performance tracking community, go to: www.rise.global

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/risedotglobal

Twitter: https://twitter.com/risedotglobal

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/2734321

For press and media enquiries contact:

Toby Beresford

+44 203 286 1568

toby@rise.global

Scorekeeping vs measurement: the former will get you to drink your milk!

This is taken from Chuck Coonradt’s book “Scorekeeping for Success”.

What’s the difference between measurement and score keeping?  According to Chuck, “the major difference between score-keeping and measurement is that scorekeeping by nature is a positive process, while measurement is a negative one”.

Measurement Scorekeeping
Catches people doing it wrong Reinforces behaviour we want repeated
Is externally imposed Is chosen by player
Is presented after game Is dynamic
Forces competition Allows competition
Maximises excuses Maximises  celebration
Discourages ownership Stimulates ownership
Causes unnatural inhibition Is natural stimulation
Is too big to correct Is frequent enough to fix

Consider tracking a child’s growth in height, done by a nurse at the child’s doctor’s office versus by the child’s mum.

Measurement is what the nurse does when she measures how tall a child is, marks it at the doctor’s office on a chart that is never seen again, and uses it to place the child in a national percentile that lets him know that he is not the tallest person in his age group in the country.

measurement vs scorekeeping

Scorekeeping is what your mother does when she periodically measures how her child’s height and makes a loving mark on the wall, charting his growth; in a manner that is visible, encouraging and stimulating.

mum measuring

 

The nurse’s measurement will result in no behaviour change. Create a defeatist attitude based on realisation that most kids are taller than you are. It won’t get you to drink your milk.

The mum’s scorekeping, as the marks proceed progressively up the wall, motivates the child to drink his milk as he sees the progress he is making.