The Success Tracking Difference (1) : Single Score

In this mini-series, “The Success Tracking Difference“, we are focusing on the differences between the new discipline of Success Tracking and traditional analytics / business dashboards.

The single score is probably the most far reaching difference.

Compare the following images, one of a typical “business dashboard” the other of a single score success tracking program.

A business dashboard tends to feature several data visualisations without enabling the viewer to see a summary of everything in one go. It is designed with “monitoring” in mind – the idea that you are always watching the monitoring dashboard in case something goes wrong.

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A typical business dashboard layout with several graphics competing for attention

A success tracking program, such as the LinkedIn Social Selling Index, on the other hand, is designed for regular check-in and focuses attention on a single number.

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There are many benefits of tracking’s single score approach:

  • Simple to understand – everyone can appreciate a single number
  • Fast personal comparison – you can quickly see if things have changed (gone up or down)
  • Easy to communicate – you can send a single score via SMS text
  • Embeds priorities – you can add another layer of intelligence to the tracking by weighting different metrics and so prioritising some over others
  • Enables peer comparison – you can benchmark and rank yourself against others

The main disadvantage of the single score is that it takes time to design a good one. Working out the relative importance of different metrics is never straightforward. it is the job of the score designer to embed their own expert biases in the weighting. That means each “score algorithm” should be adjusted for the local context and business priorities.

This also means that just taking an “off the shelf” index such as that provided natively by companies like LinkedIn with SSI above, is not a good strategy.  Using someone else’s weighting is unlikely to deliver as great returns against your business goals as if you created your own single score weighted to your business preferences.

Social Permanence Matrix

editability matrix

My Social Permanence Matrix is one way to model the different rules each social network applies to editing and deleting posts.

Lawyers have identified the edit button (and by extension the delete button) as being legally important – the edit button: can the past be erased.

The four quadrants are:

  • Editable and Delible – Facebook posts and comments. They can be removed from the record, permanently
  • Indelible yet editable – Hipchat messages you can use the substitution command to make quick edits to your last message while Quora answers are editable but all revisions are kept making your original answer indelible.
  • Ineditable and Delible – Tweets can be deleted once sent but you can’t edit them. This also applies to a certain extent to Snapchat messages that you know will be deleted once received by the recipient.
  • Ineditable and Indelible – chat messages cannot be changed once sent, nor can Trip Advisor reviews. Rise releases are stored in perpetuity too.

As can be seen from this simple matrix, there are already several different ways to handle the permanence of social content.

And now, with GDPR looming (May 2018) for most networks, social permanence presents new issues.

At stake are competing priorities such as:

  • revisionism – the ability to “change history”
  • right to be forgotten – the ability to be erased from history on request
  • data integrity – the need to maintain a dataset in its original form – for example for audit purposes

Many social networks maintain multiple digital objects, each potentially requiring slightly different  editability rules  – whether that be a photo, a post, a comment, a like, a snap, a check in, a release,  or even a view.

Right now, individual users tend to have primacy in terms of features available. For example:

  • I can clear my search history
  • I can edit Facebook posts to present an entirely different point of view to the one I originally thought
  • Politicians can delete tweets of views they no longer hold, or where they were wrong

However, as the shared, multi-stakeholder requirements around media increase in importance then the user must release power to others. I think the latest legal challenge in the USA over whether the president has the right, under the constitution, to filter out the tweets of certain citizens on a public network like Twitter, is very interesting indeed! (Trump tramples US Constitution by blocking Twitter critics – lawsuit)

I think the social networks will need to store not just the post but the revisions (and make them available) – in the way that Quora will store revisions of any answers I put on its site.

For us at Rise we will be adjusting our rules to so that we keep a copy of original releases (and allow users to find them if needed) but if you re-release that will be the one everyone sees by default, they’ll have to drill down to find the original release.

This seems like best practice of course but then as you quash one issue another emerges… does this comply with GDPR and the right to be forgotten?

Whatever the reality, there are going to be lots more jobs for digital lawyers in the future!

 

 

How one realty client uses leaderboards to track success across their business

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This is an interview with Kevin Welch on how he uses Rise boards to motivate seller behaviour in his direct reports.

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Hi Kevin, great to meet you, tell us a little bit about your role and what you do?

Hi, Toby, it is a pleasure to meet you as well. I am the Inside Sales Manager here at the Keri Shull Team – Optime Realty. I manage a team of 4 that acts as our calling team with a primary responsibility to book appointments for our outside sales agents. Along with managing them, I am responsible for database management, tracking and accountability which is why I became interested in Rise.

How are you using Rise right now? i.e. whose success are you tracking?

I am using rise to track different leaderboards for different departments in our company. We are tracking buyer ratified contracts board, seller ratified contracts board, an Inside Sales appointment total board, and then we created a greatness tracker board that combines a few different activities we feel contribute to success.

What are your players aiming to achieve with Rise?

Our players are aiming to be at the top of their respective boards.

Have you noted any successes so far?

It has created healthy competition because the agents don’t want to be at the bottom and they are all striving for the top of the list.

How do you share the scores each time you update your board?

Every time I update the boards, I screenshot the board and paste the image into a powerpoint to present weekly in our team meetings.

Excellent, thanks Kevin, we look forward to hearing how your teams go from strength to strength!

How one Rise client is increasing inside sales by tracking seller personal brand development online

Persuading sellers to change their behaviour is hard.

In the classic book on change “Who Moved My Cheese?” two mice have been trained to get their daily cheese from a certain point in a labyrinth. When the cheese then runs out the two mice behave differently – one keeps coming back to the same place, hoping the cheese will return, the other sets out for pastures new, ultimately to find a new source of cheese elsewhere in the labyrinth.

We human behave in much the same way when change comes our way.

For sales professionals, the “cheese” is where we get our next order from. For inside sales reps, sitting at a desk somewhere in the company office, it is all too easy to sit back and wait for the cheese to come to you – inbound sales calls and repeat orders all require no effort on the part of the rep.

However when it comes to selling to other businesses (B2B) the times they are a changing.

Just take a look at these stats:

  • 90% of B2B customer buying decisions start online (Forrester)
  • 75% of B2B buyers use social media to research vendors (IDC)
  • 57% of the buyer’s journey takes place before a sales professional is involved. (CEB)

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If these trends continue, pretty soon that ringing phone with potential new orders is going to dry up. Unless the sales rep is found on digital, they will never get that all important call.

This has led many organisations, including one large tech company that uses Rise, to provide re-skilling opportunities for their sales reps. Reps can be trained in creating a findable personal brand online, engaging an audience and then being found when a new purchase is imminent.

But training is only half the battle.

What really matters is what happens back at the desk during the daily 9 to 5. Are reps putting into practice the new skills they’ve been taught? Are they becoming power users of the tools provided by the business?

It is here that success tracking comes in. Our client is using Rise to provide a tracking score for each rep across a number of behaviours and tools. Each week the rep receives their personal score and a breakdown of how they scored it across different categories. The rep can drill down further and understand what activities they’ve managed to do this week, and which ones have regressed. Insights are provided into the metrics alerting them with, for example, declining behaviour 3 weeks in a row or celebrating a personal best.

rise single score personal dashboard
Sellers get a weekly personal score tracking on digital behaviours and sales tool use that contribute to online selling success. This means training can continue with automated coaching outside the classroom.

Activity and engagement is tracked in this way across multiple systems including internal CRM & seller tools, and external social media such as Twitter, Slideshare, Linkedin and blogs,

To drive further engagement with the program sellers can see the top 5 worldwide scores and top 5 for their region. This gives them a clear benchmark to aim for when trying to optimise their behaviour.

The key to the success of this program, now 3 years old, has been seeing the increase in desired behaviours across the whole seller population. For example, reps have on average increased their number of Linkedin connections by 83 each.

If you’d like to discover more or discuss, how you can run a success tracking program for your reps and partners who are making the transition to digital selling, then get in touch via the @risedotglobal Twitter account.

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How to add competitor tracking to a Business Dashboard with Cyfe & Rise

Rise Boards can fit very nicely with your existing business dashboards.

Cyfe for instance offers a business dashboard tool where you can get up and running quite easily and very cheaply – you get up to 5 widgets on their free plan.

Adding a Rise Board to a business dashboard is a great way to bring a bit of competitive interest by showing, on a weekly basis, where you stand versus your competition.

Rise now has a new feature that lets you easily add a leaderboard powered by Rise to a Cyfe business dashboard either as a list or a table.

I’ve been using Cyfe as a way to monitor the development of my personal brand online. I’ve been charting my Klout influence score and my current number of Twitter followers – two of the key personal brand metrics I’m interested in at the moment.

However, I don’t want these metrics in isolation and, since Success Tracking is all about community and stories – it’s much more interesting to see where I stand versus others on the same journey.

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To this end, I’ve added the Gamification Gurus Power 100 leaderboard  to my Cyfe dashboard. I can now see I’m number 20 this month, so a bit of work to do to maintain my top ten spot.

I’ve also created a Rise board with a selected 10 accounts whose key metrics I’m tracking. I see them as my peers when building a personal brand – the top people are aspirational (I’m a while off their reach!) but it also includes people nearer to me who I hope to nudge past every so often!

How I added my Rise boards to my Cyfe business dashboard

Using Cyfe I added each Rise board as a widget using the ‘Custom – Private URL – table’ widget type:

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Once I had the widget on my dashboard I configured it by giving it a name, pasting in the URL from Rise for the Cyfe Table widget and setting the refresh rate to 24 hours.

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By adding Rise leaderboards,  I made my business dashboard that little bit more interesting!

If you’d like to try it, then why not create an account on Cyfe (you can use the code: risedotglobal for a cheeky 20% discount if you find yourself subscribing) and then add a Custom Widget – Private URL. Configure it by adding the Rise Online Influencer board to your Cyfe dashboard. The embed URL to paste in is:

https://www.rise.global/display/online-influencer/latest/embeddable/cut/cyfe_table

Please do share screenshots of how your dashboard with Rise Boards embedded look – I’d love to see them!

How will the world be better when everyone is Success Tracking?

If Success Tracking spreads then we will see more people and organisations reaching their potential. 

This is our vision, it’s a picture of the way we want the world to be.

Rise was founded to provide technology and services that enable Success Tracking.
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A lot of potential remains unlocked because:
  • we don’t persist,
  • we don’t continue to iterate,
  • we accept the status quo or;
  • we expect external circumstances to change around us (e.g. winning the lottery).
By hoping for big wins, we can end up sitting around doing nothing, when we could have been making a start.
Success Tracking is the art of intentional, incremental, improvements that we make ourselves. It is:
  • Owning the 20 mile march.
  • The slow route to success.
  • Kaizen, little by little, 1% improvements.
  • Starting with one starfish
  • A journey worth taking note of.
  • Diligence, discipline and perseverance.
  • Achieving mastery, autonomy and purpose.
  • A mindset that runs counter to the prevalent get-rich-quick culture but it works!
I think there are two ways to success:
  1. the fast way – you get lucky and succeed fast – you land a big fish, you hit a home run or you win the lottery
  2. the slow way – hours of measured practice, tracking performance and optimising to improve, all add up to eventual success

The slow way is the best way because:

  1. It’s repeatable – you can apply the same approach to other roles
  2. It’s satisfying – you can feel you genuinely earned it
  3. You’ve achieved mastery – you know not just that you’re successful at something but why you are successful, it wasn’t just luck
  4. It’s respected – friends and peers will value your persistence
  5. You can take time to enjoy the journey – make friends along the way, take note of the highway, study the geeky aspects of what you’re doing. The journey to success can be as worthwhile as the achievement itself.
Slow success of course can take time – it took Gamification Guru Andrzej Marczewski 5 years to change career to his dream job – https://blog.rise.global/2017/07/04/7-ways-to-train-for-your-dream-job-lessons-learned/ – but change it he did, tracking his progress all the way.
Maintaining interest in performance over a long period of time is hard.
Most of us start with good intentions. We set up a dashboard we plan to check regularly, reviewing our analytics and optimising behaviour but over time we inevitably fade.
Success Tracking offers a methodology for us to achieve success by keeping us interested in our weekly or monthly performance.
Success Tracking does this through:
  • newsletters – we receive regular news bulletins tracking our success
  • storytelling – personalised stories  that bring the data to life “personal best!”
  • community – when we journey together we go further, we conform to peer behaviour
  • positive scorekeeping – we focus on tracking what we what more of so its always aspirational
We’ve set up Success Tracking University as an place for us to teach and explore the Success Tracking paradigm. Together we can make a vision of slowly achieved potential a reality.
I am keen to hear how you can help!