Changing behaviour with a simple score [webinar – 30 Jan]

Next Tuesday we will be running our first ever webinar on “Score Science” – the art and science of using a personal score to change behaviour.

Popularised by FitBit™ this personal analytics technique is now being used by organisations across the globe including PwC, IBM and the United Nations.

In this intro-level webinar (limited to 100 attendees) Toby Beresford, rise.global founder, will explain the approach, share real world examples and outline the benefits of using a single score to drive behaviour change.

By attending you will learn:

  • what is score science
  • how a single score provides great feedback
  • how leading global organisations are helping distributed employees develop positive habits

This webinar is free to attend. You are encouraged to ask as many questions as you like!

TIME:
1600 (GMT) / 1100 (EST)

DATE:
30 JANUARY 2018

Sign up to attend

Please note the webinar uses zoom.us – for best experience download and install zoom ahead of time.

webinar

Update, here’s the webinar recording:

3 Twitter New Year’s Resolutions

Twitter. Are you an excitable user, where Twitter is your first point of contact to the world, the priority when sharing your companies’ news, an integral part of your influence and marketing?

Or is Twitter is a job on the list of things to do, a tricky and time consuming ‘must’ when trying to spread your personal or corporate brands… you might not get it – but you know it’s somewhere your brand has to make an appearance.

Whether pertinent news drips from your fingers or you deliberate over every character, as soon as you press ‘Tweet’ your lovely shiny bit of news and influence tumbles along in a sea of others’ news and influence.

Take.  A step. Back. Can you see your bigger influence trajectory on Twitter? Do you know what you want to do in 2018? Are you lost in a sea of insight statistics that you haven’t checked for weeks, trying to reassemble your maths GCSE to see if you’re doing any good?!

Here are some Twitter New Years resolutions to start 2018 a bit more confident that all your effort is getting you somewhere.

 

#1 – Get some clarity.

Our desire to see how well received each tweet  has become is a natural addiction. It is a case of ‘variable ratio reward’ – we never know how well each post will do. If, however, you’re just counting number of likes and retweets without asking the bigger picture questions ie. are these likes from regular engagers? Has the tweet resulted in the behaviour you want? How many of these tweets will result in the behaviour you want? Then you are guilty of only tracking Vanity Metrics and not Clarity metrics. To track Clarity metrics, you must ask not only, ‘is this Twitter data useful?’ but also ‘What can I do about it?’ – Tracking what you are doing on Twitter in parallel to useful  data about who and why are people engaged can give depth and refinement to future activity.

#2 – Do a dashboard cleanse

Dashboards can be overwhelming. They give you stats you didn’t even know you needed, all dressed up nicely in picture graphs so that in order to answer the question ‘Am I doing ok on Twitter this week?’ It takes, a pen, paper, brainspace and some time. All of which we’re short on right now. Try something easy and simpler next year:

Rise.global consolidates the data you want into one simple score, that you can access easily and check every week via the app online, email or twitter. By just checking your score, you can quickly see and keep track of how you’re doing on the data you actually want to track. You choose the metrics, Rise fetches the data and puts it into an easily understandable format and if you did have that time and brainspace, you can always dig down into each metric individually to see how it’s going.

#3 – Go compare.

We can all learn from others, especially others in the same sphere as our brand. Look at how others are using Twitter innovatively and ask the same Clarity questions as you ask yourself. How many regular engagers do they have? And what are they doing to keep them there? Add to and shape your strategy and then use Rise to track what you’re doing to keep you accountable to the goals you set yourself. Rise can also track the same metrics in your competitors. Just add your competitors accounts to your Scorecard and you can see their scores with yours, and again dig down into their metrics to see where they are gaining success.

The New Year, New You approach only works when you’ve done the ground work to keep it accountable. Set up tracking and attainable goals in easy to manage chunks so you don’t give up in the short term, don’t forget to track the Clarity metrics first and keep listening to others in your sphere. To get your easy to track score or build your Scorecard of competitors or colleagues, sign up for your free trial here.

Lexicon changes

We’ve made some changes to our core product lexicon today:

  • Board Managers are now known as Administrators
  • Players are now as Users
  • Boards are now as Scorecards
  • Releases are now as Scorecard Bulletins
  • Data Collectors are now as Score Collectors
  • Data Entries are now Score Entries

Over the years our product has changed from where we started out – as a way to generate leaderboards – to reflect our changed focus as a way to generate individual scorecards.

Indeed one of our biggest customers hardly shows the leaderboard to its users at all.

How Google is using the principles of Success Tracking

An email from the team at Google Maps landed in my inbox recently.  I knew that it was a “robo-generated” email, and yet I got engaged.  The title of the email grabbed my attention first – “Your  review is making a difference”.  As I looked at it further and digested fully the message, I realised that Google was using the 5 core principles of Success Tracking

So, here’s how:

This bit of the email shows that I have opted-in to receive the success tracking report (score)

And the main part of the email shows how Google are adhering to no prizes, a simple score, storified content and positive score keeping

This is a great example of how just relevant feedback, storified and positive, is driving my behaviour change.

Great to see #success tracking at work.

 

Setting up a success tracking practice

rawpixel-com-252127.jpgMany organisations need a success tracking practice, they just don’t realise it yet.

As any Team Sky cyclist will tell you – it’s great to be able to rely on the Team Sky staff team and the array of coaches on everything from telemetrics to nutrition.

Think about having your own team of performance coaches at work – wouldn’t that be fabulous?

Well some organisations are already well on their way – PwC, the United Nations and others – have set up success tracking programs, initially targeted at social media success. Employees can sign up to the program and they get personalised tracking scores combined with peer networking and coaching advice to help them succeed at social media.

The success tracking approach is one that you can introduce into your own organisation, or as a consultant, you can provide as a service to your clients. All it needs is a blend of coaching and attention to numerical feedback.

Learn more in this slide deck:

Dunning Kruger Effect and why scorekeeping matters

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We all need ways to get an accurate reflection of our true skills. Photo credit: Septian Simon

One of the reasons we all need good scorekeeping is that it is a human trait  to misperceive our own strengths and weaknesses.

This is known as the Dunning-Kruger effect and was first covered in the paper Unskilled and unaware of it: how difficulties in recognizing one’s own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments.

What’s interesting is that the effect occurs at both ends of the ability spectrum:

  • beginners tend to over estimate their strengths
  • experts tend to underestimate them

That’s where a good scorekeeping and success tracking program can help each of us – by providing an accurate reflection of progress against either pre-defined standards, peer comparison or both.

Success Tracking for Sports Bars

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Photo Credit: James Sutton

A question on the Q&A site Quora, “What are the KPIs for a Sports Bar in 2017?“, prompted a revisit of the G.E.R.M. model for phasing your success tracking metrics.

Here’s the G.E.R.M. inspired answer:

G = Getting Going

  • are we putting on our target number of sports viewing events in the categories we’re focusing on – e.g. # major events per month

E= Engagement

  • are our audience enjoying the experience. – e.g. can we count/estimate dwell time, whether they are repeat visiting

R = Reach

  • are people bringing friends? how many parties have we accepted each month? is overall footfall increasing?

M = Monetisation

  • is spend on food and drinks increasing? are people tweeting and sharing their experience online (this is a form of monetisation as they are effectively doing your advertising for you – “earned media”)

 

Importantly with any G.E.R.M. success tracking program – it is vital to focus only on the metrics of one phase at a time – there is no point in working on Reach if you don’t have Engagement.

At a recent meetup, I found one e-commerce entrepreneur making that very mistake, this time in a costly way. He was shelling out hundreds of pounds a day for Adwords without first ensuring that his conversion rate was sufficient to make it worth it. Without a good conversion rate (akin here to an engagement metric) on your sample cohort there is no point in growing your advertising spend to reach a larger  group – you’ll just get the same dismal conversion rate but with a larger number of people.