Automation to accelerate change management in an enterprise. #ChangeTech

The pace of change in our digital world is super fast.

Change might mean new business processes, new tools or simply a renewed focus on performance in a key area.

With change coming thick and fast, that means change management budgets are increasingly stretched – more change initiatives but the same pot of cash.

That means change managers have a problem: there sometimes isn’t the time or resources to run a full scale change management program with face to face training and above the line communications campaigns.

In digital change there are no 3 month long lead times, changes can sometimes be quite literally overnight.

For change managers that means they need solutions to accelerate their change management programs.

Many are turning to automation to help with the heavy lifting.

We are calling these new tools #ChangeTech. Examples include rise.global the scorecard platform and kinetik, a digital card game. They cost less than a face to face coach or trainer and can be deployed globally within hours instead of weeks. Perfect for organisations with staff distributed across the country and the planet!

Using rise.global as a ChangeTech tool

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Using a rise.global scorecard for your change program requires little more than a connection to the internet, a list of staff and access to activity data.

Via the principles of success tracking and score science, a change manager designs a score that embodies all the desired behaviours of the change.

The score is then automatically calculated each week for each user of the program and delivered to them as a personal scorecard. The scorecard shows their progress in achieving the objectives, the change over time, and crucially, their relative ranking with peers.

One organisation that has already trail-blazed rise.global as a ChangeTech tool is data-driven marketing and loyalty analytics firm Aimia.

Nathalie Maslia, Global Organisational Change Management Consultant at Aimia said, “With the increased digitisation of business, change tends to happen faster and more often across enterprises. This can mean that, when there is a need for change, the budget to communicate and bed down change is tight.

“As part of our transition to Microsoft Office 365 across Aimia, we used a rise.global scorecard to communicate adoption of key O365 and Sharepoint behaviours to our staff. Each participating staff member received a personal score showing their progress in achieving the key behaviours we had identified within a short period of time. What could have taken months in terms of awareness and adoption was achieved in weeks.

Another advocate of using automation to accelerate change management is Mike Quindazzi, Managing Director at PwC:

“I am keen to see business leaders adopt social media to build their digital presence and engage in the marketplace. Sharing insights in ways that builds trust is critical to the future of relationships and business development. Leveraging scorecards and leaderboards in ways that help “automate” part of the change management process can be an effective and productive way to aid the process. Adding this element of gamification helps to increase not only user adoption but also expertise on use of the platforms. “

In this growing age of automation it’s no surprise that change management itself should have automated tools to help it do it’s work. We hope to see more #ChangeTech innovation in due course.

McKinsey & Co. research showed that successful execution of change management can boost ROI on an initiative by 143% – now with ChangeTech solutions like rise.global that automate some of the process, more teams will be able to use change management as they seek to embrace and thrive in a world of rapid digital change.

To learn more about rise.global automated solutions to accelerate your next change management initiative, contact us or book a call directly with Toby Beresford via LinkedIn today.

Nudge theory

Nudge theory is an idea that uses psychological concepts to explain why people behave in certain ways.

According to Nudge theory, it takes only small environmental changes, reinforcement or using individual’s inertia to affect people’s behavior. One example, related to eating behavior, is the attempt to encourage healthy eating. Supermarkets simply placed arrows on the floor pointing to the fruit and vegetables, which had the effect of increasing sales of healthy food.

This theory also has a variety of applications to the workplace.

For example, the UK government wanted its citizens to enrol in pensions. Thus, it created an ‘opt out’ system, in which it did not force people to enrol, but obliged people to contact the government if they wanted not to enrol in a pension saving plan. Only 10% of people did.

Another strategy for ‘nudging employees’ is creating new spaces in the workplace, as employees may find it difficult to change their behaviour in a familiar setting. Thus, if you do not want your employees to congregate next to the water cooler, you can change the environment around the cooler, e.g. make it smaller, and thus this behaviour may no longer be desirable. You do not have to force your employees to behave in a certain way, but can subtly ‘nudge’ them in a way that will make your employees more effective, and your business more successful.  

Nudge theory was originally suggested by Thaler and Sunstein in their book Nudge. You can find out more about both academics and many more behavior science experts by visiting the “Behaviour Explorers” scorecard on rise.

If you want to find out more about how Nudge theory can help your business, see the infographic below created by PsySci.

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This is a guest post by Marcus Clarke of PsySci. Thanks Marcus!